Dial-a-Doping:
The First Step to Gang Involvement.

Dial-a-Doping:
A First Step to Gang Involvement.

While the process of dial-a-doping, or calling a number to get a drug delivery, is an aspect of drug trafficking, it’s only one part of a larger and more complex criminal operation.

Drug trafficking is a pervasive and destructive problem in our communities, and Dial-a-Doping is one of the many ways it manifests.

At a Glance.

The Anatomy of Gang Leadership.

Gang leaders hire people for extortions and kidnapping to force repayment of debts from lower level gang members, including the young dial-a-dopers.

Organized Crime Groups

Mid-level Gangs

Street Gangs

Source: Preventing Youth Involvement in Gangs, Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General, 2011

How Dial-a-Doping Works — How Dial-a-Doping Works — How Dial-a-Doping Works —

How Dial-a-Doping Works.

Drug users call a designated phone number and organize a time and place to have their drugs delivered.

Once the drug number is activated, it can operate 24 hours a day facilitate distribution of drugs to customers.

Before a dial-a-doper receives the drugs for sale they are either pre-packaged or packaged at a safe house.

Safe houses are typically rented by individuals who are paid a nominal fee to do so in their own names or even family members who are likely unaware of what is happening in the house. 

The drugs are usually delivered within half an hour to one hour of the call made to the dial-a-doper

The Realities of Street Level
Dial-a-Dope Involved Youth.

Dial-a-dopers are drawn to gang life by the prospect of making a great deal of money.
However, the reality is a never-ending cycle of debt.

Dial-a-dopers, often front drugs to their most trusted clients, putting them at risk of being ripped off. Despite their risky occupation, Dial-a-dopers are usually held responsible for any losses that occur.

Despite the strict control of the gang leader, it is common for dial-a-dopers to accumulate debts.

The gang leader will not always know who his dial-a-dopers are and the dial-a-dopers do not always know whom they are working for.
Dial-a-dopers are not well protected by the gang leaders. Given the secrecy of gang life, the families of dial-a-dopers are not well-protected from any direct involvement in the transactions.
Dial-a-dopers almost always have a valid driver’s license.

The idea of loyalty in drug trafficking and gangs is a complete falsehood. There is no loyalty. They will inevitably be set up by those who they think they are working with or for and their competitors will want to stop them. This almost always happens with extreme violence, putting the dial-a-doper, their families, and the community in harm’s way.

Dial-a-dopers, often front drugs to their most trusted clients, putting them at risk of being ripped off. Despite their risky occupation, Dial-a-dopers are usually held responsible for any losses that occur.

Despite the strict control of the gang leader, it is common for dial-a-dopers to accumulate debts.

The gang leader will not always know who his dial-a-dopers are and the dial-a-dopers do not always know whom they are working for.
Dial-a-dopers are not well protected by the gang leaders. Given the secrecy of gang life, the families of dial-a-dopers are not well-protected from any direct involvement in the transactions.
Dial-a-dopers almost always have a valid driver’s license.
Most gangs do not give the dial-a-dopers access to stolen vehicles for transporting drugs. Before being hired by a gang, dial-a-dopers do not need to show loyalty by stealing from a rival gang. despite their low level in the gang hierarchy, it is not easy for dial-a-dopers to leave the gang at any time.

If you are ready to leave gang life behind,
there is help available for you.

Reach Out
with the Gang Intervention
and Exiting Team.

Helpline: 604-897-6023
gangintervention@cfseu.bc.ca

Criminal Gang Leadership

Organized crime groups, including those in British Columbia, operate like a sophisticated business with structured cells or mid-level gangs.

These groups require various resources to maintain their illegal operations, such as transportation and financing for their dial-a-dope networks.

Combatting gang leadership is a crucial aspect of efforts to reduce gang-related crime and violence, as disrupting the leadership structure can greatly disrupt the gang’s ability to carry out its operations.

Drug Packaging & Delivery

To maximize profits, drug dealers sometimes “cut” or dilute the drugs with other substances, which can be dangerous to the user. In recent years, the opioid fentanyl has been found to be a common additive in street drugs, and even small amounts can be lethal.

In British Columbia, for example, fentanyl was found in more than 80% of overdose deaths in 2020, highlighting the serious risks associated with the drug trade.

Once packaged in small plastic bags, the drugs are ready for distribution.

Reloaders and Safehouses

In British Columbia’s drug trade, safe houses play a significant role in storing and packaging drugs, as well as conducting illicit activities such as money laundering and weapon storage.

These houses are typically rented out to individuals for a nominal fee, with rental agreements made in the individual’s or family member’s name, often without their knowledge of what’s happening inside.

The primary objective is to keep the safe house separate from gang members so that if law enforcement discovers it, there is no evidence linking it to any specific gang or member. 

Dial-A-Doper Delivery

The drugs are usually delivered within half an hour to one hour of the call made to the dial-a-doper, putting young dial-a-dopers in potentially dangerous situations.

In British Columbia, gangs often recruit teenagers around the age of 16 who have their driver’s license to become dial-a-dopers. These young individuals may be exposed to violence, addiction, and other dangers associated with the drug trade.

Customers or drug users are provided with a phone number to call, but the young dial-a-dopers who deliver the drugs can be at risk of harm, from rival gangs.

Get in Touch inquires@cfseu.bc.ca

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Dial-a-Doper Delivery

In British Columbia, gangs are known to target young people around the age of 16 who have their driver’s license, recruiting them for these dangerous and illegal activities.

Like many teenagers, these individuals are often open to adventure and willing to take risks, which makes them susceptible to being lured into the world of drug trafficking.

It’s essential to raise awareness about the risks and consequences associated with becoming a dial-a-doper and to provide resources and support to prevent vulnerable youth from being exploited by criminal gangs.

You play an important role in Understanding Youth in Gangs. Gangs and Organized Crime impact every community in British Columbia. By working together, we can collectively stop recruitment, and reduce violence.
Get in Touch
+61 403 743 000
inquires@cfseu.bc.ca